GeyerGorey LLP Issues Updated Representative Matters List; Experience is Wide and Deep

Representative Matters

Our attorneys have led and participated in some of the highest profile matters in the past decade, both while in the government and in private practice. We have been involved in the most significant criminal cartel cases, the most important mergers, the most notable civil antitrust investigations, the largest procurement fraud cases, and game-changing antitrust cases that reached the United States Supreme Court. Our collective experience stands as a testament to our work ethic, our drive for excellence, and the trust and responsibility we have been given by our clients and the government.

International Cartels:

  • Led investigation and prosecution of marine contractors engaged in conspiracy to suppress and eliminate competition to install deep sea oil platforms
  • Led investigation and prosecution of international freight forwarders engaged in conspiracy to fix prices on international air cargo shipments
  • Led investigation and prosecution of household-goods moving contractors engaged in conspiracy to fix prices for international moving services provided to Department of Defense
  • Investigation and prosecution of graphite electrodes manufacturers
  • Investigation and prosecution of ocean shipping companies
  • Investigation and prosecution of a FTSE 250 engineering company that resulted in the indictment, extradition and conviction of its former chief executive
  • Defended foreign construction company in investigation and prosecution of alleged billion-dollar bid rigging scheme, in related qui tam litigation, and in other related matters
  • Defended foreign vitamin manufacturers in investigations and prosecutions of alleged international price-fixing agreements
  • Defended foreign specialty chemical manufacturers in investigations and prosecutions of alleged international price-fixing agreements
  • Defended U.S.-based executive of foreign company in criminal and civil litigation related to his alleged role in an international cartel to fix prices in the marine supply industry
  • Defended foreign executive of foreign company in criminal and civil litigation related to his alleged role in the conspiracy to fix air cargo rates around the world
  • Defended international freight forwarder in criminal litigation related to its alleged role in an international conspiracy to rig bids on U.S. military shipping contracts
  • Investigation and subsequent prosecution of foreign vitamin manufacturers for price fixing conspiracy

Domestic Price Fixing and Bid Rigging:

  • Defended electrical products manufacturer in first felony prosecution under the Sherman Act and in civil treble damage litigation
  • Represented a class of nurses in litigation against a hospital association and a number of Arizona hospitals
  • Represented the State of Ohio against a number of dairies for allegedly rigging bids of school milk
  • Investigation and prosecution of highway paving contractors in multiple districts for bid rigging
  • Investigation and prosecution of military insignia providers supplying the Army Air Force Exchange System with over 4,000 items of insignia
  • Represented metal drum manufacturer in prosecution for price fixing
  • Investigation of polypropylene bag manufacturers and that resulted in the prosecution of a manufacturer for Buy American Act violations and conspiracy to defraud
  • Investigation and prosecution of nearly 40 cases against paving contractors for conspiring to rig bids in connection with federal and state highway and airport contracts
  • Investigation and prosecution of an auction rigging conspiracy involving auto parts to by the Department of Defense at Defense Reutilization Marketing Offices (DRMO)
  • Investigation and prosecution of multiple electrical construction contractors for conspiring to rig bids for major power wiring contracts associated with steel mills and waste water treatment plants
  • Investigation and prosecution of multiple wholesale grocery companies and bid managers for rigging bids to school districts, hospitals and jails in southern Texas
  • Investigation and prosecution of multiple dairies for rigging bids for school milk sold to districts in Louisiana
  • Investigation and prosecution of crawfish processors for fixing prices paid to crawfish farmers and fishermen
  • Investigation and prosecution of bribery conspiracy involving the reconstruction of the New Orleans levee system after Hurricane Katrina
  • Investigation and prosecution of fire protective services company and its president
  • Investigation and prosecution of an Iraq-based general construction bid rigging scheme
  • Investigation and prosecution of conspiracy to solicit kickback scheme involving security services on a US Agency for International Development contract
  • Investigation and prosecution of fuel theft from an overseas United States military facility
  • Investigation and prosecution of a Europe-based scheme to defraud the Iraqi government by facilitating the fraudulent claim for payment of armored vehicles that were never delivered
  • Represented individual accused of defrauding government defense agency out of hundreds of thousands of dollars of grant money
  • Represented company accused of defrauding government by failing to supply vitamin-enriched food products with the proper level of enrichment
  • Represented large computer software company in internal investigation of improper influence on government contracting process

General Criminal:

  • Defended CEO and three closely-held companies in a multi-state racketeering and tax fraud prosecution
  • Investigation and prosecution of multiple labor racketeering cases ranging from prosecutions of United Mine Worker Union officials for theft of union funds used to pay for the murder of a political opponent of the union president to the prosecution of two Boston-based racketeers for actions associated with their travel to California in connection with a union organizing effort at a San Rafael newspaper
  • Investigation and prosecution of the mayor of a New Jersey town for taking bribes in connection with the permitting of a tank farm at the terminus point of a major Gulf Coast to East Coast pipeline
  • Investigation and prosecution of the most prolific serial bank robber in United States history
  • Investigation and prosecution of the murder for hire of a government witness and one of the largest cocaine importation conspiracies East of the Mississippi River
  • Investigation and prosecution of numerous gun, drug and false identity cases
  • Investigation and prosecution of multiple obstructions of justice, contempt, false statement, witness tampering and perjury cases arising out of grand jury investigations
  • Investigation and prosecution of bank fraud cases
  • Represented individuals before the District of Columbia Court of Appeals in appeals from criminal convictions (more than a dozen cases)
  • Defended individual in intelligence community in investigation by DCIS for alleged violations of public corruption statutes (18 U.S.C §§ 207 & 208)
  • Defended individual in criminal investigation by Inspector General of NASA
  • Defended individual in federal bribery investigation
  • Defended government contractor in investigation by the Inspector General of the Department of Agriculture
  • Defended several regional hospitals in various unrelated federal investigations of allegedly fraudulent billing practices, Stark violations
  • Represented hospital CEO in investigation of alleged Stark violations
  • Represented pathology laboratory in healthcare fraud investigation
  • Represented national healthcare company in investigation of allegedly criminal off-label marketing
  • Represented various individuals in applications for presidential pardons

Mergers and Acquisitions:

  • Represented Warner Music in connection with the proposed acquisition of EMI by Universal Music
  • Represented DISH Network in opposition to the proposed acquisition of T-Mobile by AT&T
  • Represented Merck in connection with its acquisition of Schering Plough
  • Represented Simon Properties in connection with its acquisition of Prime Outlets
  • Obtained antitrust clearance in the acquisition of Liquid Container by Graham Packaging
  • Obtained consent decree against nuclear engineering firm which had acquired another firm with the same engineering specialty
  • Represented major home healthcare provider in acquisition valued in excess of $500 million
  • Represented pathology laboratory in merger valued in excess of $100 million
  • Represented foreign mining company in acquisition of US coal mines valued over $1 billion
  • Represented hospital management company in acquisition valued in excess of $500 million
  • Represented individual in several acquisitions of stock each valued in excess of $100 million
  • Represented major over-the-counter pharmaceutical company in four different acquisitions over several years whose values ranged from over $100 million to over $500 million
  • Represented national restaurant chain in acquisition valued at about $1 billion
  • Represented regional hospital chain in acquisition of a hospital valued above $50 million
  • Represented hospital valued in excess of $100 million in sale to state hospital system

Civil Antitrust Matters:.

  • Defended large telecommunications provider in three week trial for alleged exclusionary conduct directed towards telecom services resellers.
  • Represented large telecommunications provider as plaintiff in case alleging monopolization of market for telecom switch software.
  • Represented leading music copyright licensing organization in a decade-long investigation by the Department of Justice
  • Led the investigation of Ticketmaster at the Department of Justice
  • Led major, successful prosecution by United States Department of Justice of conspiracy among twenty-four leading market-makers in NASDAQ stocks, including Goldman, Sachs & Co. and J. P. Morgan Securities,  Inc. who had conspired to maintain spreads between buying and selling prices of NASDAQ stocks
  • Defended large telecommunications provider in multi-year litigation brought by competitive telecom carrier alleging monopolization of market for high speed data services
  • Led successful investigation and prosecution of Salomon Bros Inc. and two hedge funds, Caxton Corporation and Steinhardt Partners, LP, to limit the supply of two-year Treasury notes to the “repo,” or “repurchase agreement,” market
  • Successfully brought the Reagan Administrations ‘s first challenge to a merger (brewing industry)
  • Successfully represented the United States in a litigated matter challenging field of use restrictions in patent licensing agreement in specialty chemicals
  • Successfully represented the United States in challenge to professional rules of conduct limiting competition among accountants in Texas
  • Successfully represented the United States in challenge to acquisition by Texaco, Inc. of an independent oil refining company
  • Represented high-tech electronic service provider with respect to antitrust issues in a bet-the-company patent infringement case
  • Represented sporting goods manufacturer in vacating a consent decree
  • Represented leading music copyright pool in civil antitrust investigation leading to vacating of an earlier consent decree and modification of another consent decree
  • Represented hospital CEO in litigation arising from denial of physician staff privileges

Antitrust Compliance Counseling:

  • Advised large telecommunications provider on its price and product bundling
  • Advised large telecom provider in connection with a joint venture of three carriers to entire the mobile payments market with mobile phones
  • Advised major manufacturer of household appliances on antitrust compliance
  • Advised major manufacturer of high-end kitchen appliances on antitrust compliance
  • Advised major manufacturer of over-the-counter pharmaceutical on antitrust compliance
  • Advised regional airport on state action doctrine and compliance with antitrust laws
  • Advised national trade association on antitrust compliance and Noerr-Pennington doctrine
  • Advised international shipping company on compliance regarding competition, fraud, and foreign corrupt practices
  • Advised African government on contracting and anti-fraud and anti-corruption best practices

Other Civil Litigation:

  • Represented Haiti in multinational investigation and litigation leading to the recovery of money stolen by its former president Jean-Claude Duvalier
  • Represented developers in multiple appeals involving alleged illegal cooperative conversion terms
  • Defended law firm in $10 million professional malpractice action
  • Defended various healthcare providers in numerous different federal investigations of alleged fraud, related qui tam cases, and related whistleblower termination actions
  • Defended CMS contractor in qui tam case
  • Represented regional Medicare Advantage organization in suit against the U.S. Government
  • Defended book distributor and publisher in defamation case
  • Defended author in defamation case
  • Represented gaming company in civil rights action relating to state gaming regulations
  • Defended copyright and trademark owner in intellectual property litigation
  • Defended local retailer of gray market goods in trademark infringement litigation
  • Represented major multinational corporation in suit seeking refund of local corporate franchise tax
  • Represented government contractor in appeal of denial of security clearance
  • Defended employers in cases alleging violation of wage-and-hour statute
  • Represented developers in multiple appeals involving alleged illegal cooperative conversion terms
  • Defended employer in case alleging employment discrimination
  • Defended employer in case alleging sexual harassment
  • Defended employers in cases alleging unlawful discharge

Experience by Industry:

  • Air Cargo
  • Aircraft Parts (Domestic)
  • Airlines
  • Airport Contracts
  • Automobile Dealers (Domestic)
  • Airlines
  • Asset Forfeiture
  • Auction Rigging (Multiple Industries)
  • Banking (International)
  • Baked Goods (Domestic)
  • Baking Soda
  • Book Publishing
  • Bridge Construction
  • Carbon Products
  • Caustic Soda
  • Cell Towers (Domestic)
  • Chemicals (Multiple Products, Domestic and International)
  • Clothing and Textiles (Multiple Products, Domestic and International)
  • Computer Software
  • Construction (Domestic and International)
  • Copyright and Trademark
  • Dairy Products
  • Deep sea Oil Platforms
  • Democratization Programs
  • Electrical Products
  • Embassy Construction
  • Engineering
  • Export-Import Bank Clients (Multiple Industries, International)
  • Food Service Contracts (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Financial Institutions (Domestic and International)
  • Fire Protection Services
  • Freight Forwarding (Domestic and International)
  • Fuel Supply (Domestic and International)
  • General Construction (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Government Contracts (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Graphite Electrodes
  • Highway Construction
  • Hospitals
  • Housing Foreclosure Auctions (Domestic)
  • Information Technology (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Industrial Gases (Domestic and Multiple Products)
  • LIBOR
  • Marine Contractors
  • Medical Products (Multiple Products, Domestic and International)
  • Metal Drums
  • Military Insignia (International)
  • Military Moving and Storage
  • Mining and Related Products (Multiple Industries, Domestic)
  • Motor Vehicles (Domestic)
  • Municipal Bonds (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Nursing
  • Ocean Shipping (International)
  • Oilfield Supplies
  • Pharmaceuticals (Multiple Products, Domestic and International)
  • Polypropylene bags
  • Rock Salt
  • Seafood
  • Security Contracts
  • School District Contracts (Multiple Industries)
  • Soda Ash
  • Shipping (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Slag Removal
  • Telecommunications
  • Tobacco
  • Translation Services
  • Trucking
  • US Agency for International Development Contractors and Grant Recipients
  • Vitamins
  • Warzone
  • Waste Hauling
  • Wholesale Groceries
  • Wireless
  • World Bank Contractors and Grant Recipients (International)
  • Vitamins

 

Experience by Subject Matter:

  • Antitrust (Civil and Criminal)
  • Auction Rigging
  • Bank Robberies (Domestic)
  • Bank Fraud
  • Bid-Rigging
  • Bribery
  • Buy American Act Violations
  • Capital Crimes
  • Cartels (Multiple Products, Domestic and International)
  • Cash Smuggling (International, multiple procurements by multiple governments)
  • Civil Merger and Non-Merger Cases (Multiple Products, Multiple Industries Domestic and International)
  • Civil Rights Actions
  • Competition Advocacy
  • Contempt
  • Contracting Fraud
  • Corporate Defense (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Criminal Conspiracies
  • Defamation
  • Disaster Fraud
  • Drug Cartels and Trafficking
  • Embezzlement
  • Employment Law
  • False Claims
  • False Statements
  • Federal Trade Commission Matters
  • Firearms and Weapons Offenses (Domestic and International)
  • Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) (Multiple Industries)
  • Forgery
  • Fuel Theft
  • Grant Fraud (Multiple Industries, Multiple Agencies, Domestic and International)
  • Hart-Scott-Rodino Pre-Merger Notification
  • Health Care Fraud (Compliance, Organizational Defense, Whistleblowers)
  • Kickbacks
  • Identity Theft
  • Intellectual Property
  • Mail Fraud
  • Market Allocation
  • Mergers and Acquisitions
  • Money Laundering (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Monopolies (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Murder for Hire
  • Non-governmental Organizations (International)
  • Obstruction of Justice
  • Overseas Contingency Operations
  • Perjury
  • Presidential Pardons
  • Price Fixing
  • Procurement Fraud (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Professional Malpractice Defense
  • Public Corruption
  • Qui Tam Matters
  • Racketeering
  • Securities Fraud
  • Stark Violations
  • Tax Fraud (International, Domestic and State)
  • Territorial Allocation
  • Webb-Pomerene Organizations (International)
  • Weapons Offenses (Domestic and International)
  • Whistleblowers (Multiple Industries, Domestic and International)
  • Wire Fraud
  • Witness Tampering

“Upstart Start-Up” GeyerGorey LLP Opens Dallas Office

“Rocketing from two to eleven attorneys in eight months, GeyerGorey LLP sports over 200 years of cross-disciplinary prosecutorial experience involving a host of domestic and international industries where each of its attorneys has worked on internal investigations and high stakes cases for an average of more than 20 years.”

For more, click the link below:

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IRS Criminal Cases Filed

Examples of Employment Tax Investigations – Fiscal Year 2013

The following examples of employment tax investigations are written from public record documents on file in the court records in the judicial district in which the cases were prosecuted.

Pennsylvania Businessman Sentenced for Tax Evasion
On July 24, 2013, in Pittsburgh, Pa., Richard D. Edwards, of Monroeville, Pa., was sentenced to 18 months in prison and three years of supervised release.  Edwards pleaded guilty to three counts of failure to pay over tax.  According to court documents, Edwards was the sole owner of the home improvement company Custom Patio Rooms.  In 2006, 2007, and 2008, Edwards failed to pay over to the IRS the federal income taxes withheld from his employees and the Federal Insurance Contributions Act taxes due and owing.

Former Owner of Employee Leasing Company Sentenced for Failing to Pay Payroll Taxes to the IRS
On July 18, 2013, Salt Lake City, Utah, Richard R. Whatley, a former owner of Alliance Staffing Management Inc. (ASM), was sentenced to 51 months in prison and ordered to pay $541,513 in restitution to the IRS. Whatley pleaded guilty in January 2013 to willfully failing to account for and pay over employment taxes. In January 2010, a federal grand jury charged Whatley with five counts of willfully failing to account for and pay over employment taxes, relating to three different employee leasing companies that he allegedly operated and controlled between the years 2001 and 2006.  The tax loss associated with Whatley’s criminal conduct during these years totaled more than $2.3 million. According to the plea agreement, during the 2002 through 2004 tax years, Whatley held an ownership interest in and had the ability to control the finances of ASM, an employee leasing company. Whatley’s control included determining the amount of employment taxes that had to be paid over to the IRS and the authority to decide which bills would be paid and which bills would not be paid. As charged in the superseding indictment, in the fourth tax quarter of 2003, Whatley caused the collection of employment taxes from ASM’s employees’ wages and then willfully failed to pay over $541,513 for the employees’ portion of employment taxes to the IRS.

Pennsylvania Man Sentenced for Theft from Employee Benefit Plan and Tax Fraud
On July 17, 2013, in Scranton, Pa., Charles Yaskulski, of Nicholson, Pa., was sentenced to 17 months in prison, two years of supervised release, and ordered to pay $548,768 in restitution. Yaskulski was convicted of theft from an employee benefit plan and failure to file an income tax return.  According to court documents, Yaskulski was the former president and majority shareholder of Eagle Warranty Corporation which marketed and sold used car warranty policies to customers in twelve states nationwide. Eagle Warranty also established a profit sharing plan, whereby company employees could make payroll-funded contributions to a company-sponsored 401(k) retirement plan. Yaskulski previously admitted to the theft of approximately $16,000 from the retirement plan in 2008 and 2009. Yaskulski also failed to file employer’s quarterly federal tax returns for Eagle Warranty for each tax quarter in 2009.

Arkansas Businessman Sentenced for Failing to Pay Federal Income Taxes
On July 1, 2013, in Fort Smith, Ark., George Avlos was sentenced to 30 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $291,760 in restitution to the IRS. Avlos pleaded guilty on February 27, 2013 to failing to file a federal tax return and failing to pay employment taxes. According to court documents, Avlos was the sole owner and president of LinLex Inc., a company that provided consulting services concerning Department of Transportation regulations.  Avlos was responsible for collecting, accounting for, and paying over LinLex’s payroll taxes. During 2007 and 2008, LinLex withheld payroll taxes from its employees’ paychecks but failed to make payments to the IRS. LinLex failed to account for and pay over a total of approximately $109,543 in payroll taxes. In addition, Avlos failed to file a personal income tax return for 2006, a year in which he had an income of approximately $199,489.

South Carolina Man Sentenced for Tax Evasion and Employing Illegal Aliens
On June 24, 2013 in Columbia, S.C., Ji Duan Fang, of Hanahan, S.C., was sentenced to 12 months in prison, six months in a community corrections center, and three years of supervised release for failure to pay employment taxes and harboring illegal aliens. According to court documents, Fang owned and operated Jade China Buffet, a restaurant in North Charleston, and he knowingly hired at least 14 illegal aliens to work at the restaurant.  From 2008 through 2011, Fang paid the illegal alien employees in cash and did not collect or pay employment taxes for these employees. Fang’s failure to collect and pay the employment taxes for the illegal alien employees resulted in $212,225 in unpaid taxes.

California Resident Sentenced for Employment Tax Evasion Scheme
On June 24, 2013, in Los Angeles, Calif., Jason M. Harvey, formerly of Yorba Linda, Calif., was sentenced to 24 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $11,738,000 in restitution for aiding in the evasion of payment of federal payroll taxes.  According to his plea agreement, Harvey, was identified as the legal owner of several payroll processing companies including Advanced Business Payroll, Inc., Global Business Outsource Solutions, Inc., and Global Consulting, Inc.  He was responsible for filing correct payroll tax returns, collecting payroll tax and remitting payroll tax withheld from employees of the client’s businesses to the IRS and State of California. During the period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2006, Harvey failed to pay over $10 million in payroll taxes that were actually due by the Global companies for the wages paid to employees, and failed to file some of the payroll tax returns required to be filed with the IRS. On February 4, 2013 Michael Harvey, Jason Harvey’s father, was sentenced to 30 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $15,177,106 in restitution. Michael Harvey, pleaded guilty to evading payment of over $15 million to the IRS, admitting that he caused the companies to not honor the levies, and aided Jason Harvey to cause those companies to not honor the IRS levies.  Another co-defendant Denise Browning was sentenced to 42 months in prison and one year of supervised release after being found guilty of two counts of aiding and assisting in the preparation of false payroll tax returns.

Payroll Company Owner Sentenced in Tax Case
On June 21, 2013, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Robert Sacco was sentenced to 78 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $26,729,098 in restitution jointly with another defendant. Sacco pleaded guilty on October 26, 2012 to one count each of conspiracy to defraud the United States by impeding the IRS, money laundering and tax evasion.  According to court documents, Sacco was the owner and chairman of the board of Paysource, a Dayton-based professional employer organization which provided services that enabled business owners to cost-effectively outsource the management of human resources, employee benefits, payroll and workers’ compensation and other strategic services. Sacco and others conspired to avoid the payment of federal employment taxes owed by Paysource for 2007 through 2009 and concealed from the IRS the legitimate tax liabilities the company owed. Sacco directed co-conspirators to prepare fraudulent IRS forms claiming that the wages paid by the company and the resulting tax liabilities were significantly lower than the wages the company actually paid.

Former Toy Company Owner Sentenced for Failure to Pay Employment Taxes
On June 12, 2013, in St. Paul, Minn., Kim Robert Calkins, of Eden Prairie, Minn., was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison for failure to pay federal employment taxes. Calkins pleaded guilty on September 26, 2012. In his plea agreement, Calkins admitted that from the third quarter of 2008 to the final quarter of 2010, he failed to pay to the IRS the employment taxes withheld from employees of Princess Soft Toys. Despite receiving regular notices that the employment taxes were still due, Calkins neglected to pay the amount owed. The total tax loss in this case is $852,361.

Tennessee Man Sentenced on Tax Evasion Charges
On June 3, 2013, in Greeneville, Tenn., Paul Adams, of Kingsport, Tenn., was sentenced to 36 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,535,745 in restitution. According to court documents, Adams formed a professional employer organization, employing 500 employees for 23 client companies. Adams performed clerical services for the 23 companies, including withholding federal payroll taxes and filing federal payroll tax returns. During a 17-month period, Adams calculated and collected the correct amount of withholding and payroll taxes, but reported and paid a much smaller number to the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration. Adams pocketed more than $2.5 million paid by his client companies and the employees.

Former Owner of Oklahoma Pool Company Sentenced for Tax Fraud
On May 28, 2013, in Oklahoma City, Okla., Theodore Michael Zachritz, of Nichols Hills, Okla., was sentenced to 18 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $461,363 in restitution to the IRS. Zachritz pleaded guilty in January 2013 to one count of willfully failing to collect and pay over to the IRS federal income taxes.  According to court documents, Zachritz and his wife owned and operated Lifestyle Pools, LLC in Oklahoma City. As owner of the company, Zachritz deducted and withheld more than $290,000 in federal income taxes, Social Security taxes, and Medicare taxes from the wages of Lifestyle Pools employees. Zachritz failed to pay those taxes to the IRS.

Oklahoma Bookkeeper Sentenced for Embezzlement and Tax Evasion
On May 6, 2013, in Oklahoma City, Okla., Carolyn Dawson was sentenced to 24 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,843,674 in restitution for embezzlement and evading federal payroll taxes. According to court documents, Dawson worked as a bookkeeper for a wholesaler of greenhouse supplies where she maintained payroll, prepared payroll tax returns, and paid withheld taxes to the IRS. From January 2007 through November 2011, Dawson defrauded the business by paying personal credit card expenses from the business bank account. Dawson also evaded federal payroll taxes by failing to file a 2010 payroll tax return for the company, failing to make payroll withholding payments to the IRS, and altering the books and records of the company to conceal her failure to make withholding payments.

Comptroller of New York Payroll Services Company Sentenced for $20 Million Fraud
On April 12, 2013, in Sacramento, Calif., Kerry Seaman, of Lake Ronkonkoma, N.Y., was sentenced to 44 months in prison and ordered to pay $19,141,618 in restitution. Seaman pleaded guilty on November 19, 2010 to wire fraud. According to court documents, Seaman was the comptroller for Ingentra HR Services Inc., a payroll services corporation in Hauppauge, N.Y.  Ingentra, then known as Humanic Solutions Inc, was hired by Sacramento County in late 2004 to process the payrolls for Sacramento County’s Special Districts. As part of the payroll services, Ingentra calculated the tax payments for the clients and the clients’ employees and then transmitted the payments to the state and federal tax authorities. Ingentra was responsible for paying the income tax withholdings to the IRS and to file the Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Form (Form 941) with the IRS on behalf of the clients. From 2005 until April 2010, Seaman and co-defendant Albert Cipoletti defrauded the County of Sacramento Special Districts and two other companies of the tax withholdings intended to be paid to the IRS. Ingentra collected the correct amount from the clients but underreported to the IRS the amount owed, and diverted the difference to Ingentra’s operating account for Ingentra’s own use. Cipoletti and Seaman sent funding letters to the clients that correctly calculated payroll and federal tax withholdings for the clients’ employees, and the clients wire transferred funds to Ingentra to pay both the payroll and taxes. Cipoletti and Seaman then filed false Forms 941 with the IRS, understating the true employee tax withholdings for these clients. Cipoletti and Seaman wrongfully diverted in excess of $20 million in tax withholdings from the clients that should have been remitted to the IRS on behalf of the clients and the clients’ employees. Cipoletti was sentenced in May 2011 to 78 months in prison and ordered to pay $19,141,618 in restitution.

Kentucky Man Sentenced for Attempting to Evade Paying Taxes and Wire Fraud
On April 12, 2013, in Lexington, Ky., David Byron was sentenced to 41 months in prison and ordered to pay $688,530 in restitution for wire fraud and attempting to evade paying taxes. According to court documents, Byron admitted that from 2006 through April 2010 he devised a scheme to defraud at least seven clients of his bookkeeping business. Byron told the clients he would facilitate payment of their taxes owed to the IRS and other state and federal government agencies. In reality, Byron wired money from their bank accounts to his bank account and used the money to supplement his lifestyle.

Missouri Business Owner Sentenced for Failing to Pay Taxes
On April 11, 2013, in Springfield, Mo., Paul Ray Rose Jr., of Highlandville, Mo., was sentenced to 27 months in prison and ordered to pay $586,739 in restitution to the IRS. On November 26, 2012, Rose pleaded guilty to two counts of failing to pay taxes. Rose owned and operated Highlandville-based Newby Enterprises, dba J.B. Enterprises, Inc. According to court documents, from 2006 to 2009, Rose withheld a total of $37,521 in employment taxes from his employees’ paychecks, but willfully failed to pay over the taxes to the IRS. Rose also failed to file individual income tax returns from 2006 to 2009, thereby failing to report income earned from his business. Based on more than $3.2 million in gross revenues and more than $1.7 million in gross profit for the years 2006 through 2009, Rose owed the IRS $375,631 in unpaid income tax.

North Carolina Couple Sentenced for Tax Fraud Conspiracy and Health Care Fraud 
On April 10, 2013, in Greenville, N.C., John Curtis Alspaugh was sentenced to 40 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,614,003 in restitution. Helen Blue Alspaugh was sentenced to 18 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,392,115 in restitution. On January 8, 2013, the Alspaughs pleaded guilty to one count of tax fraud conspiracy and John Alspaugh also pleaded guilty to one count of health care fraud. According to court documents, John and Helen Alspaugh formed Basic Home Health Care, Inc., a home health care business located in Dunn, N.C. Basic Home Health Care, Inc. provided personal care services to people who were homebound and needed assistance with their activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living.  The Alspaughs collected employment taxes from employees and failed to pay over the taxes to the IRS, resulting in a tax liability in excess of one million dollars for the tax periods beginning in March 2003 and ending in December 2010.

Businessman Sentenced for Failure to Pay Payroll Taxes and Bank Fraud
On April 4, 2013, in Columbus, Ohio, Robert Jeffrey Johnson was sentenced to 15 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,334,052 in restitution to the IRS and $252,500 in restitution to the victim financial institution. Johnson pleaded guilty on September 27, 2012 to failure to pay employee payroll taxes, bank fraud and concealing documents in a bankruptcy proceeding. According to court documents, Johnson, president of Smith & Johnson Construction Company, borrowed $20 million from lenders in 2004 and 2005 to fund company operations. However, during 2004 and 2005, Johnson used his position at Smith & Johnson to have about $7 million transferred to him and to business entities controlled by him. Part of Johnson’s scheme included securing a line of credit to pay off any outstanding accounts and the end of the fiscal year to make it appear that he, or business entities he controlled, owed no money to Smith & Johnson. Johnson also purchased vehicles with funds provided by Smith & Johnson, then sold the vehicles and had the proceeds sent to himself or his representative. When the construction company filed for bankruptcy in 2006, Johnson filed false documents, failed to submit all financial records and hid assets from the bankruptcy trustee. In addition, Johnson defrauded the IRS in the amount of $156,008 in the first quarter of 2006 by withholding funds from employees’ paychecks for taxes and failing to pay the funds to the IRS.

Ohio Business Owner Sentenced for Employment Tax Fraud
On April 3, 2013, in Columbus, Ohio, Charles E. Watts Jr., of Jeffersonville, Ohio, was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,443,048 in restitution to the IRS. Watts pleaded guilty on November 2, 2011 to attempting to evade and defeat the payment of employment taxes. According to court documents, from 1998 through 2008, Watts was the owner and operator of Dimensional Construction, T&R Electric Works, Watts Electric Co., and Watts Electric Company of Ohio, LLC. Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2004, Watts evaded $1,443,048 in employment taxes for 12 tax periods. Watts used a substantial portion of the funds to purchase numerous assets and pay other personal expenses. During 2004, Watts evaded paying employment taxes by establishing a business name, operating under that name, incurring employment tax obligations, then terminating the business only to establish another one under a different name and Employer Identification Number. Watts opened several business bank accounts utilizing these various business names, and used those accounts to funnel employees’ withholdings from account to account in order to elude IRS Collections’ efforts. In addition, Watts established a shell company, Valley Construction & Property, Inc., and used the company bank account to pay personal living expenses and to purchase major assets. Watts placed multiple assets in the name of Valley Construction & Property, Inc. in order to disguise the fact that he was the true owner of these assets. Watts also recruited several individuals who helped him conceal various assets from the IRS by placing them in their own name. These assets included real estate, luxury vehicles, and a pleasure boat.

Husband and Wife Sentenced for Various Tax Crimes
On March 25, 2013, in Houston, Texas, James R. Dixon was sentenced to 33 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,397,511 in restitution. On February 27, 2013, Sharon C. Dixon was sentenced to 11 months in prison and ordered to pay $183,801 in restitution. The Dixons both pleaded guilty in October 2012. James Dixon pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion. Sharon Dixon pleaded guilty to two counts of willfully failing to file tax returns. According to court documents, the Dixons owe $890,000 in individual income taxes from their 2005 through 2008 income tax years, plus more than $700,000 in unpaid employment taxes of a company for which James Dixon had the duty to pay over to the IRS.

New York Tax Preparer Sentenced for Tax Evasion and Bank Fraud
On February 13, 2013, in Buffalo, N.Y, Vincent P. Mangione, of North Tonawanda, N.Y., was sentenced to 30 months in prison and three years of supervised release for tax evasion and bank fraud. He was also ordered to pay more than $800,000 in restitution. According to court documents, Mangione operated MTS Payroll and Mil-Sher Tax Services, Inc. The companies provided payroll services and bookkeeping and tax preparation for individuals and businesses. Between December 2002 and April 2007, Mangione, without the knowledge of the businesses he represented, filed fraudulent quarterly federal tax returns. In order to avoid detection, the defendant obtained the actual amount of withholding tax the businesses owed to the IRS. Mangione then filed a false quarterly tax return that under-represented the amount owed to the IRS and kept the difference for his own benefit.

Owner of Japanese Restaurant Sentenced for Tax Crimes
On January 30, 2013, in San Francisco, Calif., Michael Chen, the owner of Fune Ya Japanese Restaurant, was sentenced to 33 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $459,105 in restitution. Chen was convicted by a jury on March 27, 2012, on filing false tax returns, failure to file tax returns, and mail fraud. A federal jury found that Chen filed a false 2004 U.S. income tax return for an S Corporation (Form 1120S) for his restaurant, failed to file corporate income tax returns for the restaurant for 2005 and 2006 and filed nine false employer’s quarterly federal tax returns (Forms 941) with the IRS. He used the U.S. mail to file nine false quarterly sales and use tax returns with the California Board of Equalization. Evidence at trial showed that Chen maintained detailed records of Fune Ya’s daily receipts in twenty-six boxes marked “Seasoned Octopus.”  The boxes were stored in a crawl space beneath the restaurant floor. The cash sales shown on Fune Ya’s receipts were not reported to the IRS. The evidence also showed that Chen maintained an encrypted Excel spreadsheet documenting $1,910,803 in sales, while he reported $450,165 in sales to the California Board of Equalization, and $65,738 in sales to the IRS. Chen also paid Fune Ya employees cash wages totaling $548,919 for the 2004 through 2006 tax years. Employees received cash wages in white envelopes each payday. Chen failed to include these cash wages on the quarterly payroll tax returns (Forms 941) filed with the IRS.

Owner of Maryland Business Sentenced for Failing to Pay Employment Taxes
On January 23, 2013, in Greenbelt, Md., Alphonso Tillman, of Fort Washington, Maryland, was sentenced to 24 months in prison and three years of supervised release, for failing to account for and pay over employment taxes. Tillman was also ordered to pay restitution of $2,205,991. According to his plea agreement, Tillman was the president and sole owner of Remote Surveillance Technology Solutions, Inc. (RSTS), and its successor, Remote Surveillance Technology Services, LLC, (RSTServ). The companies were headquartered in Landover, Maryland, and provided security guards to protect commercial and residential properties in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia. RSTS and RSTServ withheld taxes from their employees’ paychecks, which the companies were required to pay over to the IRS on a periodic basis. Tillman failed to file the required forms or pay the payroll taxes due for RSTS and RSTServ, with the exception of payments made by RSTS to the IRS because of IRS collection efforts.  The total amount of tax loss resulting from Tillman’s failure to pay taxes owed by RSTS and RSTServ is $2,205,991.

CEO and CFO of Assisted Living Facility Chain Sentenced for Tax Fraud
On January 16, 2013, in Wilmington, N.C., Ronald E. Burrell, former chief executive officer (CEO) of Caremerica Inc., and Michael R. Elliott, former chief financial officer (CFO) of Caremerica Inc., were each sentenced to 60 months in prison and ordered to pay over $4.8 million in restitution. Burrell, of Wilmington, N.C., pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the IRS on January 3, 2012.  Elliott, of Loris, S.C., pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the IRS on July 18, 2012. According to court documents, Burrell and Elliott co-owned and operated a chain of assisted living facilities in North and South Carolina. Burrell and Elliott were the corporate officers responsible for ensuring that the Caremerica companies collected, reported and paid over federal employment taxes to the IRS. The Caremerica companies accrued more than $4.5 million in employment tax liabilities between approximately 2003 and 2006. Burrell and Elliott filed, or caused to be filed, false IRS forms that reported full payment of the employment taxes due, when in fact only a small fraction of the taxes, or none at all, were paid. Additionally, Burrell and Elliott took active steps to conceal information from the IRS, specifically, the sale proceeds of a company in which they owned a majority interest. As a result of his concealment efforts, Burrell deceived the IRS into accepting a $29,000 settlement on a $300,000 personal tax liability and opened another assisted living facility with the proceeds. Burrell and Elliott then filed false 2005 federal income tax returns that failed to report the proceeds. Elliott and Burrell also obstructed justice by making false statements under oath in bankruptcy proceedings and in IRS disclosure forms.

Former Owner of Xpress Flex, Inc. and Payroll America, Inc. Sentenced for Fraud and Filing a False Tax Return
On January 9, 2013, in Boise, Idaho, Michael Wayne Davis, II, of Raleigh, North Carolina, formerly of Eagle, Idaho, was sentenced to 51 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $954,640 in restitution to Xpress Flex victims and $45,290 to the IRS for the tax loss. Davis pleaded guilty on September 10, 2012 to wire fraud and filing a false tax return. According to court documents, in 2009 and 2010, Davis owned and operated Xpress Flex, Inc., a Boise, Idaho, company that administered, on behalf of employer-clients, flexible benefits plans for tax-free, qualified benefits, such as health care and dependent care. Xpress Flex received monetary contributions from its employer-clients of pre-tax withholdings from their employees’ paychecks. According to court documents, Davis misappropriated $954,640 of Xpress Flex client funds and used them to pay personal credit card charges and the business expenses of his other company, Payroll America, Inc. Court documents also showed that from 1994 through 2009, Davis owned and operated Payroll America in Boise, Idaho. Payroll America provided payroll administration and payroll tax filing services to its employer-clients. Pursuant to contract documents, employer-clients would deposit sufficient funds with Payroll America to meet their payroll and payroll tax obligations, which Payroll America would pay when they came due. According to court documents, in March and April 2007, Davis misappropriated $2 million of Payroll America employer-client funds, wired them into his E*Trade brokerage account, and then invested the funds in the stock market. Davis’ E*Trade investments generated approximately $192,436 in capital gains income. According to court documents, Davis wired this money into his and his wife’s personal checking account. The wire transfer was annotated “E-Trade Gains.” However, Davis intentionally failed to report capital gains income from E*Trade investments on his 2007 or 2008 tax returns, causing a tax loss of $45,290.

Wisconsin Woman Sentenced for Failure to Pay Federal Payroll Taxes
On January 4, 2013, Lisa Bartz Vanden Elzen, of DePere, Wis., was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison for failing to pay federal payroll taxes over to the Internal Revenue Service. According to court records, during the period from July 2005 through December 2010, Bartz Vanden Elzen failed to pay more than $193,000 in payroll taxes withheld from the wages of employees of Dairy Transport and also failed to pay to the IRS the employer’s matching share of these payroll taxes, which totaled $81,000. Bartz Vanden Elzen is required to make full restitution to the IRS in the amount of approximately $274,000.

Operator of Payroll Companies Sentenced for Fraud and Money Laundering Crimes 
On January 3, 2013, in Greensboro, N.C., Arthur S. Weiss, of Winston-Salem, N.C., was sentenced to 185 months in prison for employment tax fraud and other crimes.  Weiss was also ordered to pay more than $7 million in restitution to numerous victims, including the IRS, the North Carolina Department of Revenue, and former clients. Weiss pleaded guilty to charges of wire fraud, bank fraud, money laundering, and tax obstruction on October 5, 2012. According to court documents, Weiss operated professional employer organizations, which provided payroll-related services to client companies. For his client companies, Weiss agreed to pay the employees, withhold and remit federal and state taxes, prepare and file the federal and state employment tax returns, and provide workers compensation insurance (WCI). Weiss did pay the employees and withheld the employment taxes, but he failed to remit the employment taxes, keeping them for his personal use. From 2004 to 2012, Weiss failed to file employment tax returns and failed to pay over to the IRS employment taxes in excess of $4 million. According to court documents, Weiss used a portion of his fraud proceeds to purchase expensive jewelry and cars.

World Health Alternatives CEO Sentenced for $41 Million Fraud Scheme
On December 4, 2012, in Pittsburgh, Pa., Richard E. McDonald was sentenced to 130 months in prison and three years of supervised release. McDonald pleaded guilty in April 2012 to charges of wire fraud, securities fraud, willful certification of false statements to SEC, failure to pay over payroll taxes, and income tax evasion. According to information presented to the court, in 2003, McDonald became the President, Principal Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors of World Health Alternatives, Inc. (WHA). Around June 2004, McDonald also became the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of WHA. Between February 2003 through August 15, 2005, McDonald defrauded WHA and its investors. He transferred funds from WHA to his personal bank account and other accounts under his control. McDonald also manipulated the financial records and statements of WHA by understating the amount of unpaid payroll taxes of WHA and its subsidiaries, and by overstating the amount of loans purportedly made by him to WHA. In addition, McDonald stole money from WHA by directing purchasers of newly issued shares to transfer the funds for the shares to accounts under McDonald’s control. McDonald stole approximately $6 million, and then spent the money on himself. In his capacity as CEO of WHA, in WHA’s financial statements, McDonald understated the actual number of outstanding WHA shares.  This was a false representation to the SEC, WHA shareholders, and prospective purchasers of WHA stock. The fraudulent understatements of the number of outstanding WHA shares falsely overstated WHA’s earnings per share, and thereby inflated the apparent market value of WHA stock. As a result of McDonald’s fraudulent conduct, WHA shareholders lost $41 million. McDonald also failed to report the funds he had fraudulently obtained from WHA and its shareholders on his personal tax returns. Finally, McDonald failed to pay over to the IRS the payroll taxes which WHA had withheld from its employees.

Ohio Businessman Sentenced for Employment Tax Fraud
On November 30, 2012, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Charles C. Painter, of Dayton, Ohio, was sentenced to 15 months in prison and ordered to pay $11,802,748 in restitution.  On February 17, 2012, Painter pleaded guilty to tax fraud. According to court documents, Painter was employed as the Chief Executive Officer and President of Paysource, Inc., a payroll company. Painter willfully aided and assisted in the preparation and filing of a false corporate income tax return with the IRS for the third quarter of 2007. The tax return fraudulently stated that the total wages Paysource II, Inc. paid to employees was $2,441,566 and as a result, Paysource II, Inc. incurred an employment tax liability of $603,532. Paysource II, Inc. actually paid $6,630,667 in total wages to its employees and incurred an actual employment tax liability of $1,710,688.

Owner of Washington Roofing Company Sentenced for Employment Tax Evasion
On November 29, 2012, in Seattle, Wash., Bruce H. Sprague, owner of Bruce’s Roofing in Enumclaw, Washington, was sentenced to 24 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,179,761 to the IRS.  In July 2012, Sprague pleaded guilty to paying a portion of his employees’ wages in cash from 2005 through 2008 and to not collecting employment taxes including Social Security, Medicare and income tax withholding from the cash wages. According to his plea agreement, Sprague informed his employees in early 2005 that they would receive a portion of their wages in cash. The cash payroll was about fifty percent of each employee’s pay. No payroll taxes were collected on the cash portion of the employees’ pay. By paying in cash and not reporting the wages, Sprague avoided approximately $1,179,761 in employment taxes for 2006 through 2008. Even as he was failing to collect and pay over the employment taxes, Sprague was taking more than $3.9 million in wages and profits from the business for 2005 through 2008.

Former CEO Pennsylvania Business Sentenced on Tax Charges
On November 27, 2012, in Erie, Pa., Frederick Zurn was sentenced to 54 months in prison and ordered to pay $278,323 in restitution to the IRS on his conviction of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and violations of federal income tax laws. According to information presented in court, Zurn was the CEO and President of Erie Copy Products, an office equipment company based in Erie, Pennsylvania. He conspired with the Vice President of Finance and others to submit forged lease documents to banks and financing companies which listed new copy equipment. They would then either deliver used copy equipment to the customer, no equipment at all or deliver equipment that the customer never agreed to lease. The conspiracy resulted in victim losses of more than $2.5 million. In addition, from 2008 through 2011, Zurn failed to make payroll tax payments to the Internal Revenue Service on behalf of his employees at Erie Copy Products.

Maryland Contractor Sentenced for Tax Evasion
On November 27, 2012, in Baltimore, Md.. Randy Benjamin Wells, of Reisterstown, Maryland, was sentenced to 13 months in prison and three years of supervised release for tax evasion. Wells was also ordered to pay restitution of $349,588. Wells paid $74,404 to the IRS prior to sentencing. According to his guilty plea, from 2005 through 2009, Wells operated Wells Contracting and Demolition Company, Inc., Triple R Contractors, Inc., and Gryphon Contracting, Inc. Although Wells hired a tax preparer to prepare his individual tax returns for 2005 through 2009, Wells failed to file the income tax return with the IRS resulting in approximately $196,200 in taxes owed. Wells used several methods in an effort to conceal his income such as purchasing personal items using funds held in a company account.  During this same time, Wells failed to pay employment taxes for the employees working for his companies. The tax loss as a result of Wells’ actions resulted in a total of $227,792 in employment taxes owed.

Massachusetts Businessman Sentenced for Tax Evasion and Conspiracy to Obstruct and Impede the IRS
On October 17, 2012, in Boston, Mass., Gary Alcock, of Westborough, Mass., was sentenced to 14 months in prison and ordered to pay $515,518 in restitution. Alcock pleaded guilty on December 9, 2011, to charges of tax evasion, conspiring to defraud the United States and willfully failing to file tax returns. On April 2, 2012, Charles Adams, Catherine Floyd and William Scott Dion were convicted by a jury of conspiracy to defraud the IRS by promoting an “under the table” payroll scheme doing business as Contract America. Dion and Floyd were also convicted for conspiracy to defraud the IRS through the use of an “underground warehouse banking” scheme designed to conceal subscriber income and assets from the IRS. According to information presented in court, Alcock owned and operated a trash hauling business called G&K Trucking, as well as a landscaping business called Bark, Mulch and Loam. Between 2001 and 2004, Alcock set up a nominee company called “Alex Management” to divert and hide business receipts and help his businesses fraudulently “disappear” on paper to evade IRS assessments and collection activity. Alcock also used Contract America to pay his employees “under the table” without withholding or paying Social Security, Medicare and income taxes. Dion was previously sentenced to 84 months in prison, Floyd to 60 months in prison, and Adams to 48 months.

Former Owner of Paving Business Sentenced for Failure to Pay Payroll Taxes
On October 12, 2012, in Boston, Mass., William E. Belleville, of Groton, was sentenced to 18 months in prison, one year of supervised release and ordered to pay $460,000 in restitution for failing to pay payroll taxes collected from his employees. On April 10, 2012, Belleville pleaded guilty to conspiracy and tax evasion charges. According to court documents, Belleville was the former owner of a paving and plowing company, Mass. Paving. From 1993 to 2006, he withheld payroll and income taxes from his employees’ wages, but failed to remit those sums, totaling approximately $460,000, to the Internal Revenue Service.

Former Owner of Sewing Company Sentenced for Payroll Tax Violations
On October 12, 2012, in New York, N.Y., Dong Sun Mun, the former owner and operator of Match Fashions Inc., was sentenced to 36 months in prison and three years of supervised release for his role in a scheme to evade payroll taxes and for jumping bail. Mun was also ordered to pay more than $304,000 in restitution to the IRS. According to the court documents, Mun owned and operated Match Fashions, a Manhattan company that did sewing work for couture companies. From 2004 through 2006, Mun cashed many of the checks he received from customers at check-cashing establishments rather that depositing them into bank accounts. Mun used the cash to pay Match Fashions’ employees off the books to evade IRS reporting requirements. He also did not withhold or remit to the IRS payroll taxes for his employees. Mun paid nearly $2 million in cash wages and did not pay over $304,000 in payroll taxes. Mun was originally scheduled to be sentenced on the tax charges in January 2011. Shortly before that sentencing date, Mun fled to Vietnam and Korea. He was subsequently arrested when he attempted to enter Canada.

Father and Son Sentenced on Tax Charges
On October 3, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio, Eric J. McEvoy was sentenced to three years probation and ordered to pay $16,677 in restitution to the IRS. Robert McEvoy was sentenced on September 27, 2012, to 18 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $702,429 in restitution to the IRS. On June 13, 2012, Eric McEvoy pleaded guilty to three counts of income tax evasion and Robert McEvoy pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede and impair the lawful functions of the IRS. According to court documents, Robert McEvoy, an un-enrolled tax preparer, owned and operated Capital City Accounting, a payroll servicing company. As a payroll company, Capital City Accounting issued payroll checks, prepared payroll tax returns and made federal tax deposits on behalf of its clients.  Beginning in 2006, Eric McEvoy was employed by Capital City Accounting and assisted his father with the payroll process. Capital City Accounting billed its clients for the gross amount of their payroll, payroll taxes and fees. When clients made payments to Capital City Accounting, the payments were deposited into a Capital City Accounting bank account. Robert and Eric McEvoy failed to forward all employment taxes received from clients to the IRS. They diverted funds from the payroll account and used those funds to pay Capital City business expenses, Eric McEvoy’s personal living expenses, and for cash withdrawals. The McEvoys then either prepared and filed false Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Returns (IRS Forms 941) or failed to file the forms on behalf of its clients. Eric McEvoy intentionally failed to report over $66,000 income on his federal income tax returns for the 2006, 2007 and 2008 tax years.

Florida Lawn Service Owner Sentenced for Employment Tax Fraud and Filing a False Tax Return
On October 2, 2012, in Miami, Fla., Michael J. Cioffi, of Loxahatchee, Florida, was sentenced to 24 months in prison, three years of supervised release and ordered to pay $537,809 in restitution to the IRS. According to the criminal information and plea documents, Cioffi was the sole owner and operator of Mike Cioffi Lawn Service, in Loxahatchee.  Cioffi’s business specialized in large commercial contracts and employed approximately thirty employees per quarter between January 2005 and December 2006. Documents filed with the court show that for each quarter during 2005 and 2006, Cioffi paid wages to his employees by check, but knowingly failed to collect and truthfully account for or pay to the IRS any FICA or income taxes due and owing to the United States on these wages. Cioffi also did not file any of the required Employer Quarterly Tax Returns, Forms 941, for this period with the IRS. Additionally, for tax year 2006, Cioffi willfully filed a United States Individual Income Tax Return, Form 1040, on behalf of himself and his spouse which falsely reported that the gross receipts for Mike Cioffi’s Lawn Service were $782,437, when Cioffi knew that gross receipts were actually more than $2 million.

Phillip C. Zane, Antitrust Practitioner and Scholar, Joins GeyerGorey LLP

 

GeyerGorey LLP announced today that Phillip C. Zane has joined the Firm as of counsel.  Mr. Zane, a former federal appellate clerk, has counseled and defended clients accused of serious crimes and civil offenses for more than twenty years.  He received his law degree cum laude from New York University School of Law, and holds a bachelor’s degree in Economic History from Pomona College.  Proficient in speaking or reading a number of languages a number of languages, including Swedish, Russian, German, Polish, and Spanish, he has conducted internal investigations of alleged wrongdoing in more than twenty countries and has defended companies and individuals accused of participating in international cartels.

 

Mr. Zane’s practice areas include civil and criminal antitrust law (including litigation and counseling), fraud, money laundering, foreign asset control, public corruption, whistleblower cases, and national security issues.  He will also continue to counsel nonprofit organizations on compliance with tax law and other matters.

 

Mr. Zane’s work has changed the course of the law.  His representation of one of the nation’s leading law firms led to a clarification and narrowing of the meaning of “arising under an Act of Congress relating to patents,” which resulted in the dismissal of a malpractice claim against that law firm.  His application of game theory to decisions of whether and when a client should plead guilty to a criminal antitrust offense contributed to the adoption of a new statute limiting civil liability for antitrust offenders who accept responsibility for criminal offenses.  His groundbreaking scholarship on criminal procedure and criminal sentencing affected how many  scholars, practitioners, and judges think about maximum fines in cases involving the most serious financial crimes.  In a case he brought on behalf of an indigent client, he convinced the District of Columbia Court of Appeals to recognize a property interest in subsidized housing benefits, establishing a new procedural due process right in the District of Columbia.

 

“Mr. Zane is truly a lawyer’s lawyer, and we are delighted that he is joining our Firm,” said managing partner Bradford Geyer.

 

Mr. Zane will be resident in the Washington office.

 

Former Law Firm IT Chief and Contract Employee Vendor Indicted in $4.8 Million Billing Fraud and Kick-back Scheme

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 11, 2013

CHICAGO — The former chief information officer of a Chicago-based international law firm who was charged previously, and the president of a company that provided contract technology workers who was charged for the first time and arrested today, were indicted for allegedly engaging in a fraudulent billing and kickback scheme that netted each of them more than $2 million. NICHOLAS DEMARS, the president of NS Mater, a defunct firm that provided contract employees and technology to assist in office automation, web and database development, and general information technology, was arrested today and indicted with DAVID TRESCH, the former law firm officer who supervised the work and billing related to the contract employees.

For the first six years of the scheme that began in 2004, Demars allegedly paid Tresch a portion of the profits that NS Mater made from work its contract employees performed at the victim law firm. During the last two years ending in June 2012, Tresch allegedly received kickbacks totaling nearly all of the false billings that the law firm paid NS Mater for work that was not performed.

Tresch, 51, and Demars, 57, both of Itasca, were each charged with 10 counts of mail fraud in an indictment that was returned by a federal grand jury yesterday and unsealed today after Demars was arrested. Demars was released on bond after appearing this morning before U.S. Magistrate Judge Sidney Schenkier in U.S. District Court. Tresch, who was released on bond after he was arrested in August, will be arraigned at a later date in Federal Court.

The indictment also seeks forfeiture of $4,819,253 representing the combined net proceeds that both men allegedly obtained from the scheme, as well as their respective homes, Demars’ condominium in Chicago, and a residence in Lake Geneva, Wis., and more than $225,000 that was seized from Tresch along with his camping trailer, a van, and a luxury automobile.

The charges were announced by Gary S. Shapiro, Acting United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, and Thomas R. Trautmann, Acting Special Agent-in-Charge of the Chicago Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

According to the initial complaint, the victim law firm, which was not identified by name, reported Tresch’s alleged criminal activity and cooperated in the investigation. The firm, which has offices worldwide, hired Tresch in May 2004 and he held several positions in the information technology department before he was promoted in July 2011 to chief information officer.

The indictment alleges that between November 2004 and March 2011, the law firm issued checks totaling approximately $7.68 million to NS Mater, and Demars, in turn, kicked back $1.14 million to Tresch. In 2004 and 2005, Demars allegedly paid kickbacks directly to Tresch after paying legitimate NS Mater contract employees and payroll administrators for work they had performed for the law firm. Beginning in April 2006, allegedly to conceal the kickbacks, Demars began paying Tresch by issuing checks to Tresch’s wife and treating her as an employee of NS Mater, even though both defendants knew that she was not an employee and had not performed any work, according to the indictment. Tresch’s wife is not a defendant.

Subsequently, in late 2010, Tresch learned that that the law firm would soon stop using NS Mater contract employees, and, in February 2011, the firm directed Tresch to no longer permit NS Mater to provide personnel for the information technology department. Between November 2011 and June 2012, Demars allegedly continued submitting invoices to Tresch totaling more than $1.1 million, falsely representing that NS Mater performed work that both defendants knew was not performed. Tresch submitted the false invoices, which the firm paid, and of the $1.1 million paid during this period, Demars kicked back approximately $970,000 to Tresch, while retaining the remainder for himself, the indictment alleges.

Each count of mail fraud carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine, and restitution is mandatory. The Court may impose an alternative fine totaling twice the loss to the victim or twice the gain to the defendant, whichever is greater. If convicted, the Court must impose a reasonable sentence under federal statutes and the advisory United States Sentencing Guidelines.

The government is being represented by Assistant U.S. Attorney Terra Reynolds.

The public is reminded that an indictment is not evidence of guilt. The defendants are presumed innocent and are entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Former Xpress Flex, Inc. And Payroll America, Inc. Owner Sentenced To 51 Months For Fraud And Filing A False Tax Return

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 10, 2013

Ordered to Pay Restitution of Nearly $1 Million to Victims

BOISE – Michael Wayne Davis, II, 46, of Raleigh, North Carolina, formerly of Eagle, Idaho, was sentenced yesterday to 51 months in prison for wire fraud and filing a false tax return, U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson and Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Tax Division Kathryn Keneally announced. Chief U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill also ordered Davis to serve three years of supervised release following his prison term and pay $999,930.90 in restitution – $954,640.90 to Xpress Flex victims and $45,290 to the IRS for the tax loss. Davis pleaded guilty to the charges on September 10, 2012.

According to court documents, in 2009 and 2010, Davis owned and operated Xpress Flex, Inc., a Boise, Idaho, company that administered, on behalf of employer-clients, flexible benefits plans for tax-free, qualified benefits, such as health care and dependent care. Pursuant to those plans, Xpress Flex received monetary contributions from its employer-clients of pre-tax withholdings from their employees’ paychecks. These funds were deposited into Xpress Flex bank accounts and set aside to pay the claims of employee-participants when they came due. According to court documents, Davis misappropriated $954,640.90 of Xpress Flex client funds and used them to pay personal credit card charges and the business expenses of his other company, Payroll America, Inc. He did so without the knowledge or authorization of the employer-clients and their employees, and contrary to representations in plan documents and contracts that he would safeguard the deposits and use them only to pay employee claims.

Court documents also showed that from 1994 through 2009, Davis owned and operated Payroll America in Boise, Idaho. Payroll America provided payroll administration and payroll tax filing services to its employer-clients. Pursuant to contract documents, employer-clients would deposit sufficient funds with Payroll America to meet their payroll and payroll tax obligations, which Payroll America would pay when they came due. According to court documents, in March and April of 2007, Davis misappropriated $2 million of Payroll America employer-client funds, wired them into his E*Trade brokerage account, and then invested the funds in the stock market. Davis did so without the knowledge or authorization of the employer-clients of Payroll America, contrary to representations in contract documents that he would safeguard the funds and use them only to pay payroll and payroll taxes.

Davis’ E*Trade investments generated approximately $192,436 in capital gains income. According to court documents, Davis wired this money into his and his wife’s personal checking account. The wire transfer was annotated “E-Trade Gains.” However, Davis intentionally failed to report capital gains income from E*Trade investments on his 2007 or 2008 tax returns, causing a tax loss of $45,290. For this conduct, Davis pleaded guilty to one count of filing a false tax return.

“I’m very pleased that my office, with the assistance of the Justice Department’s Tax Division, and federal law enforcement partners were able to bring Mr. Davis to justice,” said Olson. “Those who are entrusted to manage others’ money must ensure that it is safe and available for its intended purpose, not diverted for personal gain.”

“This sentencing sends a clear message, businesses owners who misuse their positions of trust and divert funds for their own personal use will be held accountable,” said Lilia E. Ruiz, IRS Criminal Investigation Acting Special Agent in Charge for the State of Idaho.

The case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Department of Labor, Employee Benefits Security Administration, and Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation.

Today’s announcement is part of efforts underway by President Obama’s Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force (FFETF) which was created in November 2009 to wage an aggressive, coordinated and proactive effort to investigate and prosecute financial crimes. With more than 20 federal agencies, 94 U.S. attorneys’ offices and state and local partners, it’s the broadest coalition of law enforcement, investigatory and regulatory agencies ever assembled to combat fraud. Since its formation, the task force has made great strides in facilitating increased investigation and prosecution of financial crimes; enhancing coordination and cooperation among federal, state and local authorities; addressing discrimination in the lending and financial markets and conducting outreach to the public, victims, financial institutions and other organizations. Over the past three fiscal years, the Justice Department has filed more than 10,000 financial fraud cases against nearly 15,000 defendants including more than 2,700 mortgage fraud defendants. For more information on the task force, visit www.stopfraud.gov.

ZACHARY MAN SENTENCED TO PRISON FOR DEFRAUDING BAKER BUSINESS

BATON ROUGE, LA – United States Attorney Donald J. Cazayoux, Jr., announced that RICHARD GLENN BOYETTE, age 48, of Zachary, Louisiana, was sentenced today by U.S. District Judge James J. Brady to a term of imprisonment of fifty-one (51) months.

BOYETTE had previously pled guilty to mail fraud in connection with a multi-year scheme to defraud Commercial Tire of Louisiana, Inc. (“Commercial Tire”), located in Baker, Louisiana, with offices in Scott and Hammond. While working as the company’s Controller, from 2001 through late 2010, BOYETTE admitted defrauding the company and its employees. To execute the scheme, the defendant (a) created and approved fraudulent payroll checks to himself, which he was not authorized to receive; (b) obtained fraudulent payroll checks and gained control over the funds; (c) created false entries in the company’s accounting records that falsely reflected that the fraudulent payroll checks had actually been issued to other employees; and (d) prepared and distributed fraudulent W-2s that concealed the stolen funds.

At today’s sentencing, the Court found that BOYETTE’s fraudulent scheme caused a loss to Commercial Tire of more than $1.2 million. Accordingly, BOYETTE was ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $1,283,151. BOYETTE was also ordered to forfeit an additional $1,283,151 to the United States as proceeds of his crime. Following his release from imprisonment, BOYETTE will also be required to serve a two-year term of supervised release.

This investigation was conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Alan A. Stevens and James P. Thompson.

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California Man Sentenced to 15 Months in Prison For Conspiracy to Defraud USAID of $386,279 – Admitted Scheme to Embezzle Agency Funds Meant for Global Health

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE For Information Contact:
Tuesday, November 6, 2012 Public Affairs
(202) 252-6933

WASHINGTON – Everett Lipscomb Jr., 42, of Aliso Viejo, Calif., has been sentenced
to 15 months in prison on a charge stemming from his role in a conspiracy to embezzle more than $386,000 from a federal program meant to address global health problems.
The sentence was announced by Ronald C. Machen Jr., U.S. Attorney for the District of
Columbia, and Michael G. Carroll, Deputy Inspector General for the U.S. Agency for
International Development (USAID).
Lipscomb pled guilty in March 2012 to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail
fraud, a federal felony. He was sentenced on Nov. 5, 2012 by the Honorable Beryl A. Howell in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. As part of his sentence, Lipscomb was ordered to pay full restitution of $386,279 to USAID. Lipscomb also consented to an order forfeiting any property he owned up to that amount. As indicated in court filings, the government has already seized about $49,000 in proceeds from the scheme from other coconspirators. Upon completion of his prison term, Lipscomb will be placed on two years of supervised release.
As part of his plea, Lipscomb admitted that he conspired together with Mark Adams, a
former deputy director at a private contractor that did business with USAID, and Adams’s wife, Latasha Bell. Lipscomb admitted that Adams used his position at the contracting company to submit and approve false and fraudulent invoices and thereby obtain money.
In Lipscomb’s case, the bogus invoices claimed amounts due for services from Octopus
Limited Audio and Visual, a company controlled by Lipscomb. However, neither Lipscomb nor Octopus – or anyone else – performed the work and services claimed on the invoices. Lipscomb admitted that between April 2008 and August 2010, he received payments from the USAID contracting company totaling $386,279. Of that amount, Lipscomb kept $157,372 for himself and passed the remainder, $228,907, back to Adams and Bell.
Lipscomb further admitted that the fraudulent bills were paid with money that should
have been used for USAID’s global health program. The program addresses major global issues, including HIV/AIDS. At sentencing, Judge Howell noted that the company that employed Adams was seriously impacted by the crime. The company lost its contract with USAID and several employees lost their jobs as a result.
Adams, 44, and Bell, 36, of Fort Washington, Md., pled guilty last month to their roles in
the conspiracy. Adams admitted that the scheme involved more than $1.084 million in
fraudulent payments through such fake invoices between 2006 and 2010. Adams and Bell used the payments to complete an extensive renovation of their home and to buy luxury automobiles.
Adams and Bell are scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 14, 2012, also before Judge
Howell. Under federal sentencing guidelines, Adams faces a sentence of up to 51 to 63 months of incarceration. Under the plea agreement, Bell agreed to a sentence of home confinement.
In announcing the sentence, U.S. Attorney Machen and Deputy Inspector General Carroll
commended the work of the special agents from the USAID Office of Inspector General, which investigated the case. They also thanked those who worked on the case from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, including Paralegal Specialists Krishawn Graham and Nicole Wattelet, Forensic Accountant Crystal Boodoo, Assistant U.S. Attorney Anthony Saler, who handled forfeiture issues, and Assistant U.S. Attorney Jonathan Hooks, who is prosecuting the case.